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In the early hours of the morning of the 6th June 1944, C-47 aircraft 42-101025, serial number 54 of the 301st Troop Carrier Squadron, 441st Troop Carrier Group left Merryfield airfield in Somerset, England and was making its way in tight formation with other troop carriers across the English Channel to Normandy, France. On board were a crew of four and a passenger load of 18 paratroopers of the 2nd Battalion 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment plus equipment (wire, ammunition, and rafts) heading for drop zone D in Normandy France.

Born:                             19 March 1920

Enlistment date:           

Deployments:                Europe

Units:                             301st Troop carrier Squadron, 441st Troop carrier Group, 50th Troop Carrier Wing, 9th Air Force

Rank:                            1st Lieutenant

Specialisations:             Pilot

Qualifications:             

Decorations:                  Air Medal, Purple Heart

Deceased:                      06 June 1944  KIA Normandy       

Other Information:        Eugene joined the 301st Troop Carrier Squadron on October 18th 1943 at Sedalia Field from the 89th Troop Carrier Group at Bergstrom Field, Texas.  He was a graduate of the University of Arkansas and was commissioned ion the ground forces in 1942. He trained with the 301st TCS at Pope Field and Camp Mackall before deploying overseas to England via the southern route, flying his C-47.  He was nick-named  “Sack” and was noted in the squadron for his habit of picking up stray tree tops in the filter screens of his plane. He flew formation as close as the paint on the tail and once lost a landing light in a formation buzz. Gene insisted he had hit a large bird. The Operations Officer scooped a handful of leaves and twigs from the leading edge. He then admitted the bird had been sitting when hit.

 In the early hours of the morning of the 6th June 1944, C-47 aircraft 42-101025, serial number 54 of the 301st Troop Carrier Squadron, 441st Troop Carrier Group left Merryfield airfield in Somerset, England and was making its way in tight formation with other troop carriers across the English Channel to Normandy, France. On board were a crew of four and a passenger load of 18 paratroopers of the 2nd Battalion 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment plus equipment (wire, ammunition, and rafts) heading for drop zone D in Normandy France.